Embedding Electronic Components Into Clothing To Make Wearables That Are Actually Wearable

Embedding Electronic Components Into Clothing To Make Wearables That Are Actually Wearable

Learn how to embed electronic components into clothing to make wearables that are actually wearable, from Linda Machina, co-founder and CEO of Machina, a wearable tech company that's taking the world by storm. Linda has been featured just about everywhere, from the Washington Post to BBC and CNN and more.

Top Takeaways

1. What Does 'Wearables' Mean to You?

A lot of wearables rely on creating a new habit for the user. Many of these have failed, because they're just not practical. Wearing clothes, however, is something that is required by all humans every day. So why aren't wearables more popular? Here are Linda Machina's top tips for startups looking to get into the wearable field, and actually see success. 

2. Design is Key

Design is crucial for your hardware startup, regardless of whether you're making wearables or anything else. Sometimes, hardware startups are filled with engineers and software developers, but there needs to be someone with a design background, to make the design desirable to your target market.

3. Keep Manufacturing Providers Close Together

When assembling your first prototype, try to keep all manufacturing providers close together. If you don't, you'll lose time and money. If a mistake is made somewhere in the line, you'll have to start all over again, losing even more time and money. This applies to not just wearables, but also every other kind of hardware.

4. Synch Up Your Timelines

Your manufacturing timeline and go-to market strategy have to be synched. Otherwise, you'll have no product, but a market who wants your product, or a product, but no one who wants it. Take all aspects of the journey into consideration, so your various steps are working in conjunction. 

5. Your Product Will Not Sell Itself

You are the best marketer of your product. No one is more passionate about your product than you. You know more about it than anyone else. Therefore, you are the most qualified to sell your product, not a marketing agency or outside individual. At the end of the day, part of your job is marketing.

6. Securing Investment is Crucial

Securing investment for a hardware startup is a crucial component. Making prototypes for wearables is incredibly expensive. You will make mistakes. These will cost more money. You have to have the investment and funding to get you through. 

7. Your Hardware is Rarely Unique

Unless your IP is exceptional, your piece of hardware is rarely your unique selling proposition. In wearables, you're combining fashion and technology, through software, but it's still very difficult to create an idea that's completely new. You'll probably be relying on your hardware's functionality as your main selling point, not the hardware itself. 

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Learn more tips like this at HardwareCon 2018, the Bay Area’s Premier Hardware Innovation Conference on April 19th-20th.  Experience two full days of keynotes, panels and workshops focused on the most important topics around building a successful hardware company. Get your tickets here now if you want to meet the hottest startups, investors and industry leaders across the global hardware ecosystem.

About The Speaker

Linda Machina

Linda Machina

Co-Founder & CEO

Linda Machina is the Co-Founder and CEO of Machina, a wearable technology company that creates clothes which extend the functionality of the human body (www.machina.cc/). Linda has been named one of Forbes Mexico’s 30 promises under 30, featured as one of Intel’s MakeHers, Google’s Women Tech Makers, and has given talks at the Women 2.0 events in San Francisco, Explorers Festival Lisbon, Wired London, Smart Content Conference Seoul, among others. Machina has been featured in the Washington Post, BBC, CNN, Vice, Hypebeast, and more. Linda and her team are taking the industry to the next level with the idea of open source in wearable tech.

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